A (somewhat boring) First

Tonight was a first in all my years as a nurse…

Can you tell what it is?  No, it’s not my hair being down (I was getting ready for work and hadn’t pinned it up yet).  I’ll give you a hint: it has something to do with what I’m wearing.

I’m wearing a long-sleeved t-shirt under my hospital-issue scrubs.  This may not seem like much, but it’s a big deal, trust me.  Not even during my time working in Boston or in South Bend, with all of their snow and ice, did I feel the need to add a layer to my uniforms.  I’m always running around so much that I get hot, and I’ve never worn more than a short-sleeved scrub top.  But now that I’m living in Auckland?  The city that got a mere 5 minute flurry of snow for the first time in some 74 years last winter?  Now I need to wear a layer.

I’m telling you – you feel the cold differently in New Zealand.

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4 comments

  1. Kelli says:

    It is a different kind of cold! I’m used to wearing a coat outside in the winter…. now I’m getting used to wearing one inside, too. Just bought 2 merino wool shirts this weekend for layering.

  2. Laura's Blonde Moments says:

    Hey Jenny!

    Wowzers! 74 years of no snow? That’s crazy and may give the states insight into our Winter ahead, although for summer in the South, we really aren’t but in the 70-80’s (I really shouldn’t complain!)

  3. Sara says:

    I get it!!! Next thing you know, you’ll start layering all your summer dresses with merino wool 🙂 And your last line about it’s different in NZ is so true, though a bit hard to explain to everyone back home. I suppose it’s the lack of insulation that makes it so much colder, especially when my family and friends take note of the temps and say it can’t be that cold! Or they remind me that I’m used to much colder, freezing temps… but really it is different. Here in Welly, it’s colder indoors than outside most days, especially when dining out, you notice it so much. Memorable post that’s for sure!

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